Brodie learns unsettling news about the baby she carries finds comfort from the two unlikely sources: the elderly speaker of a vanishing language … and a gorilla at the zoo.
Brodie learns unsettling news about the baby she carries finds comfort from the two unlikely sources: the elderly speaker of a vanishing language … and a gorilla at the zoo.

If you are looking for a bit of an intellectual puzzle, and a marathon of acting, look no further than Precious Little. While not difficult to understand, this story takes some piecing together to figure out where it is going and how the different narratives overlap.

In Precious Little, we follow Brodie, a linguist in her 40’s who is looking to have a child. When she discovers some upsetting news about her future baby, she struggles to decide what to do. We are brought into her relationship with grad student Dre, with an old woman who speaks a disappearing language, and with a “talking” ape at the zoo.

With direction from Mika Laulainen, the three performers seamlessly transform into ten different characters. Their performances are strong and they make this task seem easy. The story comes across as disparate, with the connection between these characters unclear for a good portion of the play. It also feels that linguistic professor Brodie, and her girlfriend Dre are lacking in chemistry. It is hard to believe that they are a couple.

Thérèse Champagne plays an endearing old woman, and her portrayal of an ape is oddly engaging. Sara Andrina Brown holds the story together as Brodie. Elizabeth Holliday does a superb job playing five very different characters. These three actors are strong, though the story is lacking something.

Unfortunately the play comes across feeling a little long and the many overlapping stories do not flow together to create a clear direction.

Playing as part of the 2018 Vancouver Fringe Festival. No further performances.