Canadian spoken word artist Shane Koyczan performs a new full-length work as part of the Chan Centre's spring Dot Com Series. Photo by Kaare Iverson.
Canadian spoken word artist Shane Koyczan performs a new full-length work as part of the Chan Centre's spring Dot Com Series. Photo by Kaare Iverson.

The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts at the University of British Columbia continues its virtual Dot Com Series with a new artists’ lineup this spring.

Presented online, the performances cross musical realms from traditional Persian compositions with a contemporary twist to world premieres of new chamber works for strings and classical Indian music and dance.

While our concert hall can’t welcome usual audiences, for the time being, our cameras are rolling and I’m certain these digital offerings will delight, inspire, and maybe even surprise. – Dr. T. Patrick Carrabré, director of the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts

Highlights also include a brand new full-length performance from BC-based spoken word artist Shane Koyczan, a collection of works by female and non-binary composers performed by violist Marina Thibeault, and award-winning theatre artist Kunji Mark Ikeda’s rumination on the Japanese-Canadian internment in Sansei: The Storyteller.

Filmed at the Chan Centre’s Chan Shun Concert Hall and studios and stages in artists’ home cities around the world, all eight performances will be available for on-demand viewing from designated premiere dates throughout the spring until May 31, 2021. A variety of ancillary events will also become available to watch through the Chan Centre Connects series.

“The brilliant and diverse artists whose work will be featured this coming spring are proof that creativity and cultural expression is stronger than ever, and can serve as a beacon of light in trying times,” says Dr. T. Patrick Carrabré, director of the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts. “While our concert hall can’t welcome usual audiences, for the time being, our cameras are rolling, and I’m certain these digital offerings will delight, inspire, and maybe even surprise.”

The Chan’s spring season kicks off at the end of January with Tehran-born, Montreal-based Amir Amiri. Amiri is joined by Sardar Mohamad Jani (oud), Reza Abaee (ghaychak), Hamin Honari (percussion), and Omar Abu Afech (viola) for a program of his own compositions intertwined with Persian folk and classical pieces.

In February, contemporary Latin musician Magos Herrera joins forces with eclectic string quartet Brooklyn Rider for Dreamers, a project that celebrates music as a political act by imaginatively reinterpreting music from the Ibero-American songbook alongside new pieces.

In February, composer, erhu player, and vocalist Lan Tung will perform two world premieres for erhu and string quintet by Canadian composer Tim Brady.

In March, spoken word artist Shane Koyczan presents a brand new full-length work, Vancouver-based dance artist Arno Kamolika explores the Mother Goddess’ narratives through classical Indian music and dance in Parāśakti: The Flame Within and Kunji Mark Ikeda explores the internment and dispossession of tens of thousands of Japanese-Canadians following the attack on Pearl Harbor in Sansei: The Storyteller.

The spring season concludes in April with two works. First up is violist Marina Thibeault who presents a wide-ranging program of works for solo viola, followed by Silkroad Ensemble with Home Within, an impressionistic reflection on hope and unity in the face of tragedy.

Visit chancentre.com for the complete line-up, tickets and more information.