Leslie Dos Remedios in the Vancouver production of Baking Time. Photo by Emily Cooper Photography.
Leslie Dos Remedios in the Vancouver production of Baking Time. Photo by Emily Cooper Photography.

North Vancouver’s Presentation House Theatre and UK-based Oily Cart Theatre unite in a pre-Christmas celebration in the arts of baking and storytelling with Baking Time (Nov 24-Dec 11).

Designed specifically for three to six year-olds, their families and friends, the story of master chefs Bun and Bap comes to life through puppetry, music, and live action baking.

Here are five reasons we think you should go:

1. Western Canadian Premiere

Leslie Dos Remedios in the Vancouver production of Baking Time. Photo by Emily Cooper Photography.

Baking Time has toured England and Eastern Canada and will be making its Western Canadian premiere at Presentation House Theatre in North Vancouver this holiday season. In 2004, the production won a Dora Award for Outstanding TYA Production.

2. Live Action Baking

Photo from the Oily Cart Theatre production of Baking Time.

Bread will be freshly baked live on stage during the play. Members of the audience will get to go home with their very own tiny loaf of bread. We are told there will even be a gluten-free option available!

3. A Multisensory Experience

Leslie Dos Remedios in the Vancouver production of Baking Time. Photo by Emily Cooper Photography.

The smells, sights, textures, and sounds that accompany the making and eating of freshly baked bread, makes Baking Time a fully immersive experience for its young audience.

4. Created for Young Children & Their Families

Photo from the Oily Cart Theatre production of Baking Time.

Presentation House Theatre and Oily Cart Theatre brainstormed ways in which little ones would respond to the ideas and experiences, ultimately creating Baking Time with the children’s responses in mind.

5. Musical Storytelling

Leslie Dos Remedios in the Vancouver production of Baking Time. Photo by Emily Cooper Photography.

Music, written by Max Reinhardt, is incorporated in the production as a storytelling technique, with most of the text sung throughout the play.