The 2016 Dancing on the Edge Festival features over thirty choreographers and over eighty dance artists.
The 2016 Dancing on the Edge Festival features over thirty choreographers and over eighty dance artists.

The 28th Annual Dancing on the Edge Festival gets underway next week. Here are five reasons you should go:

[dropcap]1[/dropcap] This year’s contemporary dance festival features over thirty choreographers and over eighty dance artists.

[dropcap]2[/dropcap] The Edge teams up for two exciting events with The Dance Centre, showcasing emerging Vancouver choreographers. Julianne Chapple’s work explores body as object, surreal imagery and the imperfect nature of communication, while Thoenn Glover weaves a world where undercurrents are illuminated and the unnoticed rises to the surface.

[dropcap]3[/dropcap] The festival continues the tradition of placing dance in unusual outdoor settings with by donation site-specific works. This year includes Julia Taffe’s Aeriosa Dance Society’s Pseudotsuga – Earth to Sky. Performed in Stanley Park, the piece includes vertical dancers, musicians, all within a grove of tall trees.

[dropcap]4[/dropcap] The second non-traditional space is SFU Woodward’s Inner Courtyard, with a presentation of All Bodies Dance Project’s En Route. The piece explores different ways to traverse public spaces and negotiate our place in a crowd.

[dropcap]5[/dropcap] Audience members will have an opportunity to interact directly with the dancers and choreographers with a number of talkbacks following seven of the festival shows.

Dancing on the Edge Festival takes place at various locations around Vancouver from July 7-16. Visit http://dancingontheedge.org for tickets and information.