Deborah Fong, Mary Janeway, Paul Wong, Jeanette Reinhardt: High Profile Slow Scan (October 13, 1978). Photo courtesy of Paul Wong.
Deborah Fong, Mary Janeway, Paul Wong, Jeanette Reinhardt: High Profile Slow Scan (October 13, 1978). Photo courtesy of Paul Wong.

Everything old is new again this week as the Satellite Gallery provides a glimpse into the 70s, a fifty year-old comedy goes on tour and New Works explores tango in its past and present form.

[dropcap]1[/dropcap]Vancouver’s self-identified collective of socially and artistically motivated men and women who came of age on Vancouver’s Main Street is the focus of the Satellite Gallery newest exhibit Mainstreeters: Taking Advantage, 1972-1982 (Jan 9-Mar 14 with opening reception Jan 8).  This “art gang” (Kenneth Fletcher, Deborah Fong, Carol Hackett, Marlene MacGregor, Annastacia McDonald, Charles Rea, Jeanette Reinhardt and Paul Wong) emerged from the end of the hippie era as they drew from glam, punk and a thriving gay scene to become an important part of the local art scene. The first generation to grow-up with video cameras, the results is a focus on a decade of their lives that includes forays into sex, love, drugs and art in the area that was once the dividing line between classes in Vancouver.

[dropcap]2[/dropcap]New Works presents Tango Poema (Jan 9-10), an evening of Argentine Tango, dance and music, featuring solo pianist Linda Lee Thomas, leader of Vancouver’s tango trio Tangissimo and principal pianist for the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Exploring tango’s many dynamic forms, past and present, Tango Poema showcases performances by ten Vancouver tango dance talents, including spoken word and solo tango choreographies by Susana Domingues.

[dropcap]3[/dropcap]Oscar and Felix are on the move as the Arts Club Theatre Company takes The Odd Couple (Jan 9-Feb 4) on tour from North Vancouver to Chilliwack.  What we called an “agreeable little comedy” when it first hit the Stanley Theatre stage last January, it is the chemistry between the two leads that really made this fifty year-old Neil Simon play really come to life.  And while there is a new Oscar in this touring version, most of the cast are back as the two unlikely roomies discover what friendship is really all about.