Amy's Mythical Mornings use Canadian stories to help tell life lessons
Amy's Mythical Mornings use Canadian stories to help tell life lessons

The new locally produced animated series Amy’s Mythical Mornings is not only out to teach kids about Canadian culture, but the importance of oral history as well.

“Oral storytelling is a dying art, and Amy‘s hopes to show kids and parents of all ages that there’s great things to learn in oral traditions,” says series creator Delores Smith.

The central characters are six year old Amy and her friends Theodore and Casey who imagine themselves inside the stories told by Amy’s grandmother. Among the eight episodes currently available on Vimeo on Demand and airing on airing on the APTN (Aboriginal Peoples Television Network), are Thunderbird and Orca in which the trio go on an adventure to stop a insatiable orca whale, and in the Story of the Inukshuk they help a talking polar bear who has lost his family .

Each episode not only features a piece of Canadiana, but also contains a series of lessons for children to learn, as well as sing-a-longs, and a collection of original songs.

“It’s a wonderful world for kids to explore while at the same time learn about Canadian history and culture,” says co-producer Geoffery Anthony.

Created by Smith and Darryl Whetung, the series has even become part of the curriculum of J.F.Dion Elementary in a Metis Settlement in Alberta.

You can find more information on Facebook or see clips from the show on Youtube.